Brian McCarthy

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  • Brian McCarthy
    Keymaster
    Post count: 17

    Tough to say for sure, probably a stainless steel given it’s out doors. I’d guess around 16 gauge.

    Brian McCarthy
    Keymaster
    Post count: 17

    I’m not sure exactly what you’re asking. Typically when selecting punches you’re going to want to balance the internal radius you need to achieve with the tonnage you can deliver to the part. The air bend force chart should be your guide. This should provide guidance depending on your needs.

    Does this help?

    Brian McCarthy
    Keymaster
    Post count: 17
    in reply to: formulas #13493 |

    Peter,

    The 88° tooling is designed specifically for bottom bending 90° allowing for a 2° over bend. I’m not familiar with 35° tooling, are you sure it’s not 30°? This would be used for creating 30° (or less) bends in material. You can use the 30° tooling to bend more open angles using the air bending method but becareful not to exceed the tonnage limits on the tooling.

    You can get a good start using our Air Bend Force Chart page which will introduce you to the basic calculations you’re asking about.

    Brian McCarthy
    Keymaster
    Post count: 17

    Mike,

    You can buy tooling for a brake press or standard press which will generate the hole and flare. Mate and Wilson Tool would be a good place to start depending on your equipment. If it’s very low quantity you can probably get better service from a local tool maker.

    Brian McCarthy
    Keymaster
    Post count: 17

    That’s some pretty heavy gauge metal you’re bending! Why don’ you give me an exact profile / flat pattern that you’re working with. I’ll check it against some equations for heavy gauge metal and see where the difference is.

    Brian McCarthy
    Keymaster
    Post count: 17

    Ed,

    What are you using to generate your flat patterns? Is it done on a CAD package or are you doing it by hand. It sounds like something is off with your flat pattern strategy. Also, what type of material and thickness are you trying to bend? Tolerances of ±1/16 should be easy to hold consistently.

    -Brian

    Brian McCarthy
    Keymaster
    Post count: 17

    Olivier, as you can probably guess my preference is for Solid Edge. I found that, at least 3 years ago, their sheet metal package was far superior to Solid Works. Sheet metal in Solid Works always seemed like an add-on package and not a fully thought out extension of their system. I’ve had much less success with some of the detailed work that you do in Solid Works, especially when I’m trying to do it quickly. Most of the graphics for this site are created with Solid Works, but the only reason I use it is because of my ability to get it free through my school.

    Brian McCarthy
    Keymaster
    Post count: 17

    Bedros, thanks for the info, I’m not particularly familiar with this technique, hopefully a member of our site is and will be able to help you out. I will include a link to this on our upcoming monthly newsletter.

    Brian McCarthy
    Keymaster
    Post count: 17

    Rich, thank you for posting I’ve gotten a couple of opinions from people in the industry and will write up a full article shortly.

    Brian McCarthy
    Keymaster
    Post count: 17

    Richard, this is a great idea for a post, I will do some research on the topic and let you know when I have something up. Thanks!

    Brian McCarthy
    Keymaster
    Post count: 17

    Some basic tips:

    You’re going to want to use the same strategy that they use when doing 2D layouts, have a library of parts which you can stretch to accommodate different sizes. The advantage you have is that with the parametric options in SolidWorks so you can have a library of full assemblies. You can then modify these assemblies to your customer’s needs. My best ones were for our refrigerators, we had an iterative library, first you’d choose if the mechanical compartment was separate, on the left or on the right, then the number of openings, 1, 2, 3, or 4, finally you’d choose the drawer / door combination. This worked out to 90 iterations of refrigerators. The first model took some time but we were extremely thorough in modeling every variable, for example there were variables for the width, height and depth of each compartment, variables for the number of drawers, variables for the type of blower and its location, variables for left hand or right hand doors and the width of the mechanical compartment. The system also calculated the volume of the refrigerator and suggested blower sizes. After that creating the remaining 89 models wasn’t so bad as you’d think. After re-sizing the models all you had to do was open all of the drawings and make sure they fit on the page. It’s a lot of upfront work, and I’d suggest you start small depending on your skill level in SoldWorks, but the payoff was huge, even the old timers were eager to use the system.

    For the rest of the work like chefs counters where there wasn’t any model to be stretched I always started with the counter top, basically working from the outside in. We would work off of different 2D drawings so by starting with the major stuff first I could confirm dimensions and make tweaks when the part count was relatively low. I would then put in the outer walls of each cabinet that I was going to use, spacing them out to the plan, again to check sizing and get a feel for problem areas. Then I would put in shelving, bracing, feet, wire chases, over head shelving, etc. one component type at a time. This kept me using the same pieces over and over again by creating copies. The advantage here is that I’d get used to the measurements and fitting with each component and would get a consistent look across the assembly.

    My final piece of advice is just to stick with it. The reason the guys using 2D layouts are faster is because they’re better at the 2D system than you are at the 3D system, they have a larger library to draw from, and they know the equipment better, not because 2D systems are better for laying out large complicated sheet metal assemblies.

    Brian McCarthy
    Keymaster
    Post count: 17

    Thanks, I’ll put those into the to-do list.

    Brian McCarthy
    Keymaster
    Post count: 17

    Olivier, I can’t say what a coincidence this is… I spent about 2 years managing a team of designers as we transitioned from 2D AutoCAD layouts to 3D SolidWorks designs in the custom food service industry. We designed everything from refrigeration units to cabinets to sinks. Some of the assemblies were huge, 500 part chefs counters with wire chases refrigerators and overhead shelving. I don’t have much time today to write up all my suggestions but I will get back to you tomorrow with a much more detailed response. The good news is that there is hope, my team made the transition from 2D to 3D in about 6 months and the results were phenomenal, less rework on the floor, quicker assemblies, and we were able to correct mistakes before they made it to the shop.

    Brian McCarthy
    Keymaster
    Post count: 17

    Here is what I was able to find:

    http://www.apta.com/resources/standards/Documents/APTA-RT-EE-RP-001-02.pdf
    http://cdn.kone.com/www.kone.ca/en/Images/kone-escalator-autowalk-planning-guide.pdf?v=1

    Beyond these guidelines I’m guessing most design work is going to be proprietary to the company building the escalators. You can try reaching out to them and seeing if they have more information, they may have specifications that they share with architects.

    Brian McCarthy
    Keymaster
    Post count: 17
    in reply to: Welcome to the Forum #13382 |

    Barry, I decided to update the site a few weeks back but we’ve been around for a few years. Thanks for the compliment.

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